Have You Ever Thought About Becoming A Dental Hygienist?

Have you thought of becoming a Dental Hygienist? A career as a dental hygienist offers a wide range of challenges. In the dental office, the dentist and the dental hygienist work together to meet the oral health needs of patients.  Dental hygienists clean teeth, examine patients for signs of oral diseases such as gingivitis, and provide other preventive dental care. They also educate patients on ways to improve and maintain good oral health. Dental hygiene offers the following challenges and rewards: Personal satisfaction: One of the most enjoyable aspects of a career in dental hygiene is working with people. Personal
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How Poor Dental Care Can Affect Your Overall Health

Although you probably understand that poor dental care can lead to cavities, did you know that other, more serious health problems can also result from poor oral care? The truth is that if you don’t take proper care of your teeth, you could face far more serious consequences than a simple toothache or soame unsightly stains. Heart disease, dementia, respiratory infections and diabetic complications are among the conditions that might be affected by poor dental care. To read the complete article: http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/gum-dise as/article/how-poor-dental-care-can-affect-your-overall-health-0313
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World Smile Day – First Friday of October

World Smile Day Oct. 7, 2016 The first Friday of October each year marks World Smile Day, a day to do one act of kindness and make someone crack a smile! The day was founded in 1999 by Harvey Ball, creator of the now famous yellow smiley face, when he thought his logo was becoming too commercial and losing its real meaning, he organised the day to recognise that a smile knows no religion or politics and that we should all spread a little happiness.  And after all, it doesn’t take much effort to smile! When Harvey died in 2001,
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Common Dental Problems To Look For In Adults

The Link Between Medications and Cavities You may wonder why you’re suddenly getting cavities when you haven’t had them in years. As we get older, we enter a second round of cavity prone years. One common cause of cavities in older adults is dry mouth. Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. However, it is a side-effect in more than 500 medications, including those for allergies or asthma, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, pain, anxiety or depression, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.This is just one reason why it’s so important to tell your dentist about any medications that you’re taking. Your
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Is Your Toothbrush Damaging Your Oral Health?

Toothbrushing plays an important everyday role for personal oral hygiene and effective plaque removal. Appropriate toothbrush care and maintenance are also important considerations for sound oral hygiene. The ADA recommends that consumers replace toothbrushes approximately every 3–4 months or sooner if the bristles become frayed with use. In recent years, scientists have studied whether toothbrushes may harbor microorganisms that could cause oral and/or systemic infection. We know that the oral cavity is home to hundreds of different types of microorganisms; therefore, it is not surprising that some of these microorganisms are transferred to a toothbrush during use. It may also be possible
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Yellow Is A Nice Color For Leaves, Not Your Teeth!

Watching the leaves turn beautiful colors is one of the best things about fall. Watching your teeth turn colors isn’t quite as fun! If your teeth don’t look as bright white as they used to, don’t worry—discoloration is common. Even if you floss daily and brush the recommended two minutes twice a day, eating and drinking things like red wine, coffee, tea, and even berries and beets5can turn your teeth a less-than desirable hue. But there’s good news: There are many options that can get your smile sparkling again. In-office bleaching. Done at the dentist’s office, this is the fastest
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Got Calcium? Your Mouth Needs it!

When you think of calcium, you probably think of bones. It’s true that this mineral is essential to keeping our bones strong, but calcium is also vital to the health of your teeth. In fact, 99 percent of the body’s calcium reserves are stored in the bones and teeth, where the mineral provides structural support.1 How much do you know about calcium and its important role in your body? Test your knowledge with this true-false quiz. Aside from strengthening bones and teeth, calcium also helps muscles, blood vessels, and nerves work properly. True. The mineral is also found in blood,
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